About your Search

20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
the current state of the election and plenty of people are concerned about the trends and the same economy in these times. most important of them who are the people who will show up to the polls in november. we want to have a follow-up discussion about economics, demographics, and the expectations for 2012. this is a follow-up for what was released in november of last year. with that, i am pleased to introduce my colleagues. the co-authors of the report they are releasing at www.american progress.org. after this presentation, you have a conversation with our panel and we look forward to hearing from you as well. i encourage you to follow the conversation. our guests recent writings include the european paradox and the decline of the working class and the rise of the mass upper-middle-class. he holds a degree in sociology from university of wisconsin, madison. i say about the game yesterday. [laughter] please welcome rich. [applause] >> thank you, everybody for coming. as daniella mentioned, this is about the report to be released last november. there is obviously a you -- adding about ideo
in discretionary spending cuts drives the economy back in recession and cost 2 million jobs. on the other hand, it also goes a long way in reducing the budget deficit. even by washington standards, that all seems important. to discuss the cliff and the consequences, we have a panel of four budget watchers. bob greenstein is head of the president obama's transition policy work. doug holz-eakin, president of the action forum, headed the staff, directer of the congressional budget office. he was a member of the president bush's economic adviser and was an acting directer of cbo. finally, diane lim rogers blog z as economist mom and was chief economist for the house committee and the ways and means committee. our format today will be relatively straightforward. each speaks for five minutes, and i'll ask questions, we'll l get a discussion going here and turn it over to the audience to give you a chance to ask the questions. we've people watching on c-span and the web, and if you're not in the room, send them to publicaffairs@urban.org, and those questions will come to me. to start, donald? >> than
of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between public sector and union work force which is growing and the trade and the private sector. they are different views on politics and very different views on public policy coming from both sides. i think we're at an early stage on that. i think it is something to watch as we go forward in terms of the political objectives of public sector and private sector which ultimately different subjective you will see a bit of divergence in that. >> people love to talk about it. the division between public and private sector unions. there a certain number of tenet whether you're public or private. [inaudible] what you pay for the
even lose our country. >> ross perot, interviewed by "usa today"'s richard wol on the economy, the deficit and debt and how it's changed since he ran for president in 1992 and '96. find richard wolffe's article in today's edition of "usa today" and at usa today.com. raz perot tonight -- ross perot tonight on c-span at 9 eastern. >>> next, a look at the presidential campaign with libertarian party candidate gary johnson. the former republican governor of new mexico talks about his view of the two-party system and obstacles for third-party candidates. from "washington journal," this is 40 minutes. >> host: joining us now is gary johnson, the former governor of new mexico, a republican 1995-2003 who is now the libertarian presidential nominee, and gary johnson, first question. when you look at the major party candidates and this year's cycle, what's missing in the debate and the dialogue? and what do you wring to the table -- what do you bring to the table? >> guest: well, how about truth for starters. the notion that both obama and romney are arguing over who's going to spend mo
the economies of nations in order to make up for their own mistakes, if integrity and honesty have not prevailed on the international relations and all nations and governments were treated equally and justly in the global effort to build and expand happiness for the entire mankind, and if other unfavorable situations have not occurred, in human life, imagine how beautiful and pleasant our lives and how lovely the history of mankind would have been. let us take a look at the world situation today. indymac, the economic situation. poverty is on the rise and the gap is widening between the rich and the poor. millions of industrial countries have exceeded $63 million while the repayment of half of this amount is sufficient to eradicate poverty in the world. the economy is dependent upon consumerism and exploitation of all who serve the interest of a limited number of countries. the creation of paper assets by using influence and control over the world's economic centers constitutes the greatest abuse of history and is considered a major contributor to global economic crisis. it has been reported tha
the economy takes all the oxygen out of the election was a little bit of foreign affairs committee supreme court doesn't play among independent, undecided voters. it's a motivator for one space to get out and get to the polls because you want this person to replace justice ginsburg when she retires, for example. health care is the only thing that resonates. i don't know of any practical, it would be the point that the obama administration defends the defense of marriage act and president romney will defend the constitutionality, but it doesn't seem that social conservative question has a lot of allotted salience in some unlike a presidential debate. so i think other than health care i see much happening. >> i think it will not happen. and here is why. no major national political figure has attacked affirmative action publicly since 1996 or before. it is kind of remarkable. the republicans during the 90s for a while were seen some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. don't do it anymore and the democrats, john kerry and the early 90s, joe lieberman in the early
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7